That was a close call. 

Two years after dbddbb –nearly on the same exact day, we are back on the crime scene with Daniel Linehan. One of America’s prodigal son, he made his choreographic debuts in cities that never sleep -Seattle then New York which he left to do research at Anne Teresa de Keersmaeker’s  P.A.R.T.S.. dbddbb had left us aloof in a wave of critical enthusiasm. But Flood is a poetic piece on obsolescence and disappearance. 

Flood - Araso © ADAGP
Flood – Araso © ADAGP

On set, a collection of white mesh panels paves the way for the viewer’s imagination whilst suppressing its limits. The installation is already a standalone masterpiece. The first veil has been burnt or torn, it’s hard to tell.  Behind it, a series of semi-intact copies. Neons have been scattered in between at different heights as if to measure how badly injured they were during the war just ended. 

Flood - Araso © ADAGP
Flood – Araso © ADAGP

It could be a scene from a post-apocalyptical film or a still from the remains of a lavishly furnished manoir. A box in the center of the stage, the trap of disappearance is taking it all. Around and inside the space, 4 dancers give form to an electric merry-go-round heavily punctuated by piercing vocal expressions, sometimes clucking and physical confrontations. 

Flood - Araso © ADAGP
Flood – Araso © ADAGP

Flood creates a world where the living and their ghosts play hide and seek inside one single multi-layered dimension. Alone in the relationship to the other yet numerous in the head, dodging the present, one foot in a future arriving too quickly whilst still latching on to the past: it all sounds but too familiar. Troubling and beautiful. 


Daniel Linehan, Flood

Performance seen at the Centre Pompidou between January 17th and January 20th 2018.