After Pâquerette, it’s a five-year time leap ahead. In 2013 Dub Love, François Chaignaud, Cecilia Bengolea and Hanna Hedman (in lieu of Ana Pi) do the splits between pointe and dub. The nightlife and its glitter stick to the bodies and penetrate the skins.

François Chaignaud, Cecilia Bengolea and Hanna Hedman in Dub Love, CND
François Chaignaud, Cecilia Bengolea and Hanna Hedman in Dub Love, CND

Remixed live by MatDTSound, High Elements’ riddims (“rhythm” in Jamaican) make the audience dance. The Grand Studio’s thick concrete walls tremble as a giant speakers wall spits out loud basses. Dub surfs the reggae wave. Dub is the growing part played by sound engineers in popular music, blending the boundaries between styles. Dub is also a kind of digital, as “dubbing” is the process of transferring formats from one medium to another whithe the aim of restoring and saving.

Saving the festive side of dance, the joie de vivre, a sense of gap and highlight. Dressed in leotards, bodies are running with sweat, François’s makeup is melting, specks of glitter dust are trickling down onto the floor. Dub love is an orgy of vibrations, the haven after the battle.


Performance seen within the rerun of François Chaignaud and Cecilia Bengolea’s repertoire at the CND in Pantin, February-March 2017

Illustration © Araso